Should Christian worship have non-biblical readings?

Having non-biblical readings has become such a canon among mainline Unitarian Universalists that Unitarian Universalist Christians face a crisis on the subject of readings. Is it proper to have non-biblical readings in worship? The question of authority isn’t clear-cut. My home library has several works of daily readings: selected sections meant to be read regularly… Continue reading Should Christian worship have non-biblical readings?

Bleg: how does the lectionary or church calendar work in once-a-month churches?

This is a blog-beg for preachers and ministers of any denomination who preach or have preached in churches that meet less than weekly, and who use a lectionary or observe a traditional church calendar. I appreciate your sharing this with anyone who has experience. In short, how do you make it work? Do you use… Continue reading Bleg: how does the lectionary or church calendar work in once-a-month churches?

Preaching next on February 15

So, I’ve got about a month to prepare for my next sermon, and I’d love you to to hear it– and visit Universalist National Memorial Church — on February 15, 2015, at 11 a.m. (Directions.) That’s the Feast of the Transfiguration, and I’ll be preaching from the appointed Revised Common Lectionary texts.

True words

This video is making the rounds, and should seem familiar to anyone who has ever preached a “Saturday night special.” I don’t preach again until February 15, but I’m starting to work on it now. And I love those lectionary texts.

Published
Categorized as Preaching

The architecture of Universalist National Memorial Church, in detail

I was Googling for a set of 1939 orders of service from the Universalist National Memorial Church — where I was once minister and now, after a long break, am now a member — and found Sixteenth Street Architecture,¬† a fine architectural survey of Washington, D.C. “avenue of churches” from just north of the White… Continue reading The architecture of Universalist National Memorial Church, in detail

The sermon fit for reading

There is a practical take-away from this historical episode; keep reading. Abigail and John¬† Adams, the departing ambassador to Great Britain, and John Murray, the Universalist minister, sailed together back to America on the same vessel, the Lucretia, in the spring of 1788. Unitarian Universalists today recall Abigail Adams’s recollection of Murray’s preaching, as recorded… Continue reading The sermon fit for reading